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    cutaquig Immune Globulin Subcutaneous (Human) - hipp, 16.5% solution logo

    Cutaquig is FDA approved for BOTH adult and pediatric patients aged 2 years and older with primary immunodeficiency (PI).1

    Cutaquig is also approved with flexible infusion schedule options including every-other-week, weekly, and more frequent dosing (2-7 times per week). 

    Important: cutaquig 12-month shelf-life extension from the FDA. Do not discard the cutaquig vials with the lot numbers LISTED HERE.

    Learn more about flexible infusion schedule options to fit patients’ lifestyles1

    Cutaquig is FDA APPROVED for: 
    ​​​​​​​
    • Every-other-week dosing
    • Weekly dosing​​​​​​​
    • More frequent dosing (2-7 times a week)
    View updated Prescribing Information

    Demonstrated Efficacy

    Cutaquig (Immune Globulin Subcutaneous [Human] - hipp, 16.5% solution) was evaluated in a phase 3 clinical study1,2 

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    Proven Safety Profile

    Review the local and systemic adverse reactions of cutaquig​​​​​​​

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    Dosing and Administration

    Cutaquig is a 16.5% solution administered subcutaneously1

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    Patient Support

    Resources and support available for patients

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    References:
    1. CUTAQUIG [prescribing information]. Paramus, NJ: Octapharma USA Inc.; 2021.
    2. Kobayashi RH, Gupta S, Melamed I, et al. Clinical efficacy, safety and tolerability of a new subcutaneous immunoglobulin 16.5% (Octanorm [Cutaquig®]) in the treatment of patients with primary immunodeficiencies. Front Immunol. 2019;10(40):1-12. doi:10.3389/fimmu.2019.00040

    You are encouraged to report adverse events related to Pfizer products by calling 1-800-438-1985 (US only). If you prefer, you may contact the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) directly.
    ​​​​​​​Visit ​​​
    www.fda.gov/MedWatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

    IndicationS and usage

    CUTAQUIG (Immune Globulin Subcutaneous [Human] - hipp) is a 16.5% immune globulin solution for subcutaneous infusion (IGSC), indicated as replacement therapy for primary humoral immunodeficiency (PI) in adults and pediatric patients 2 years of age and older. This includes, but is not limited to, common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), X-linked agammaglobulinemia, congenital agammaglobulinemia, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and severe combined immunodeficiencies.

    Please click here for full Prescribing Information, including BOXED WARNING and Patient Information and Instructions for Use.

    WARNING: THROMBOSIS

    • Thrombosis may occur with immune globulin products, including CUTAQUIG. Risk factors may include: advanced age, prolonged immobilization, hypercoagulable conditions, history of venous or arterial thrombosis, use of estrogens, indwelling central vascular catheters, hyperviscosity, and cardiovascular risk factors. Thrombosis may occur in the absence of known risk factors. [see Full Prescribing Information, Warnings and Precautions (5.2), Patient Counseling Information (17)]
    • For patients at risk of thrombosis, administer CUTAQUIG at the minimum dose and infusion rate practicable. Ensure adequate hydration in patients before administration. Monitor for signs and symptoms of thrombosis and assess blood viscosity in patients at risk of hyperviscosity. [see Full Prescribing Information, Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]​​​​​​​

    Contraindications

    CUTAQUIG is contraindicated in patients who have had an anaphylactic or severe systemic reaction to the subcutaneous administration of human immune globulin or to any of the components of CUTAQUIG, such as Polysorbate 80, and in IgA-deficient patients with antibodies against IgA and a history of hypersensitivity.

    Warnings and Precautions

    Severe hypersensitivity reactions may occur with CUTAQUIG, even in patients who tolerated previous treatment with human immune globulin. If a hypersensitivity reaction occurs, discontinue the CUTAQUIG infusion immediately and initiate appropriate treatment. IgA-deficient patients with anti-IgA antibodies are at greater risk of severe reactions.

    Thrombosis may occur following treatment with immune globulin products, including CUTAQUIG. For patients at risk of thrombosis, administer CUTAQUIG at the minimum dose and infusion rate practicable. Ensure adequate hydration in patients before administration. Monitor for signs and symptoms of thrombosis and assess blood viscosity in patients at risk for hyperviscosity.

    Falsely elevated blood glucose readings may occur during and after the infusion of CUTAQUIG with some glucometer and test strip systems. When administering CUTAQUIG, measure blood glucose with a glucose-specific method.

    Aseptic meningitis syndrome (AMS) can occur with CUTAQUIG. AMS has been reported after the use of human immune globulin administered intravenously and subcutaneously and may occur within 2 days following treatment. Discontinuation of immunoglobulin treatment has resulted in remission within several days without sequelae.

    Acute renal dysfunction/failure, acute tubular necrosis, proximal tubular nephropathy, osmotic nephrosis, and death may occur with use of human immune globulin, especially those containing sucrose. CUTAQUIG does not contain sucrose.

    Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of renal dysfunction. Monitor blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and urine output in patients at risk of acute renal failure. Monitor CUTAQUIG recipients for clinical signs and symptoms of hemolysis, particularly patients with pre-existing anemia and/or cardiovascular or pulmonary compromise. Consider appropriate confirmatory laboratory testing if signs and symptoms of hemolysis are present after CUTAQUIG infusion.

    Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema may occur in patients administered human immune globulin products. Monitor for pulmonary adverse reactions. If transfusion-related acute lung injury is suspected, perform appropriate tests for the presence of anti-neutrophil antibodies in both the product and patient’s serum.

    CUTAQUIG is made from human plasma and may carry a risk of transmitting infectious agents, e.g., viruses, the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent, and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent.

    Adverse Reactions

    The most common adverse reactions (≥5% of study subjects) were local infusion site reactions (such as redness, swelling, itching), headache, fever, dermatitis, asthma, diarrhea, and cough.

    Drug Interactions

    After infusion of CUTAQUIG, the transitory rise of the various passively transferred antibodies in the patient’s blood may yield false positive serological test results, with the potential for misleading interpretation.

    The passive transfer of antibodies with immunoglobulin administration may interfere with the response to live virus vaccines such as measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella.

    Use in Specific Populations

    It is not known whether CUTAQUIG can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman or can affect reproduction capacity.

    No human data are available to indicate the presence or absence of drug-associated risk to lactation and breastfeeding.

    ​​​​​​​Overall safety and efficacy findings in pediatric age group were comparable to those seen in adults. However, infusion site reactions were more commonly observed in adults compared to the pediatric population.

    Safety and effectiveness of CUTAQUIG in pediatric patients below the age of 2 have not been established.

    Clinical studies of CUTAQUIG did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, to reduce the risk of hyperviscosity and precipitation of cardiac, renal, or hepatic adverse reaction, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

    The risk information provided here is not comprehensive; see full Prescribing Information and Boxed Warning for CUTAQUIG.

    You are encouraged to report adverse events related to Pfizer products by calling 1-800-438-1985 (US only). If you prefer, you may contact the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) directly. Visit www.fda.gov/MedWatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

    CUTAQUIG® is a registered trademark of Octapharma AG.

    Please click here for Full Prescribing Information, including BOXED WARNING and Patient Information and Instructions for Use.

    CUTAQUIG (Immune Globulin Subcutaneous [Human] - hipp) is a 16.5% immune globulin solution for subcutaneous infusion (IGSC), indicated as replacement therapy for primary humoral immunodeficiency (PI) in adults and pediatric patients 2 years of age and older. This includes, but is not limited to, common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), X-linked agammaglobulinemia, congenital agammaglobulinemia, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and severe combined immunodeficiencies.